The advantages and convenience of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) are becoming more and more attractive to public safety organizations like police and fire departments, emergency responders, rangers and lifeguards and also being used in search and rescue operations, construction and engineering companies.

Like many technical necessities, the operation of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) is a candidate for outsourcing, especially in a changing regulatory environment and with the technology itself evolving at a rapid pace. Developing pilot & UAS expertise can be a significant investment for organizations that are already at their limits with regard to personnel and budgets.

These are among the reasons it can be a good idea to at least investigate the possibility of using a high-level security company to manage and deploy drones and other autonomous aircraft to help expand services and increase effectiveness for public safety organizations.

Insurance

Right off the bat, cities and municipalities are going to want to investigate having experts involved in drone security operations. Mistakes are easy targets for litigation-minded citizens and activist organizations.

Given these realities, retaining the services of experts and FAA licensed drone pilots is almost always going to be the preferred option, especially when insurance is taken into consideration. The possibility of an accident and a subsequent surprise announcement that the drone operator lacked sufficient training is not what the average insurance adjuster or attorney is going to want to hear.

Effectiveness Of Drone Security Services

Having the right tools for the job is necessary for any situation, and doubly so when lives are in danger and security is a necessity. Developing the expertise to know when and where to fly a particular aircraft, or how to use accessory equipment in the right manner is both time-consuming and expensive, like any other worthwhile pursuit. Trying to build expertise as a hobby might be a fine diversion, but it isn’t going to meet the needs of an organization tasked with the safety of the general public.

Our drones have the features necessary to perform both law enforcement and rescue operations. Equipment like thermal imaging cameras, regular cameras and a public address system makes it possible to locate victims, keep track of suspects and do the jobs that would otherwise require the considerable expense of a manned aircraft.

These are likely to be compelling reasons to find experts and put them to work doing what they do best. The alternatives are often far too expensive and far too risky.

Regulatory Issues

Drone operation is regulated at the federal level, just like all other civilian and law enforcement aircraft. Commercial drone operation is regulated under the Federal Aviation Administration’s Part 107 Small Unmanned Aircraft Rule, which requires any pilot operating a drone for commercial purposes to obtain certification.

Our company is conscientious in fulfilling its responsibilities under applicable federal and local laws. Our pilots are certified professionals and are trained to operate our aircraft safely and effectively. Not only do we make sure our personnel comply with the regulations, we assign two people to each aircraft: one controlling and one on the ground.

Like commercial pilots, our drone personnel have extensive documentation and checklist preparation procedures they must complete before one of our aircraft is put into operation. This is vital because standardized preparation and operating procedures are more likely to expose flaws and possible malfunctions in equipment both on the ground and in the air.

Focus

Unless drone operation is likely to become an integral part of a public safety organization’s day to day operations, focusing on the mission and only bringing in outside assistance when needed is almost always the better option. Given the choice, taxpayers and government officials are far more likely to want police officers engaged in law enforcement and firefighters engaged in preserving lives and property rather than putting time and budgets into something that is only occasionally necessary.

When it comes to emergency situations, we make it a point to be prepared to help organizations like the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Our pilots are trained to assist in disaster response, which we believe makes us that much more effective.

The old saying “every marine is a rifleman” is instructive here. While certain marines have specialized tasks, ultimately their job is to carry a rifle into combat. The same is true of public safety personnel, which is why it’s very likely a better use of resources to put specialists to work only when necessary. The good news is the combination of those specialists and good public servants is a powerful thing.